Jasmine Rice vs. Sushi Rice: Your Complete Guide

Jasmine Rice vs. Sushi Rice: Rice is the staple meal for more than half of mankind, with Asia producing and consuming 90% of the world’s grain. Many societies, including China, India, and Southeast Asian civilisations, show evidence of early rice cultivation. The earliest archaeological evidence, however, comes from central and eastern China and dates from 7000 to 5000 BCE. 

More than 90% of the world’s rice is farmed in Asia, mostly in China, India, Indonesia, and Bangladesh, with minor amounts grown in Japan, Pakistan, and a number of Southeast Asian countries. Rice is grown in portions of Europe, North and South America, and Australia.

The hull, or husk, protects the harvested rice kernel, often known as paddy or rough rice. The hull and bran layers of the kernel are normally removed during milling, and a coating of glucose and talc is occasionally added to give the kernel a glossy sheen. Brown rice is rice that has been processed to remove just the husks and includes around 8% protein and a tiny amount of fat, as well as thiamine, niacin, riboflavin, iron, and calcium. 

White rice is rice that has been processed to remove the bran as well, and it is depleted of nutrients. When white rice is consumed in large quantities, there is a danger of beriberi, a condition caused by thiamine and mineral deficiencies. Prior to milling, parboiled white rice is properly prepared to maintain the majority of the nutrients, and enhanced rice contains iron and B vitamins.

Jasmine Rice

  • Rice is a popular nutritional source in over 100 nations, where it is offered with a range of tasty cuisines. 
  • Jasmine rice, also known as Thai fragrant rice, is an aromatic “long-grain” rice with grains that are almost four times as long as they are broad. 
  • Jasmine rice is available in a range of hues. White jasmine rice, in particular, is highly processed and resembles white rice nutritionally more than brown jasmine rice. 
  • There are also black, purple, and red jasmine rice cultivars, each with somewhat distinct nutritional profiles.

Healthier Varieties of Jasmine Rice

  1. Brown jasmine rice has fewer processing steps than white rice. It has only the outer husk, not the bran and germ, like all whole grains. 
  2. This ensures that the finished product has fibre and numerous nutrients. 
  3. Brown jasmine rice is lower in calories and carbohydrates than white rice due to its fibre content. Calcium, iron, and potassium are also present.
  4. Furthermore, the levels of essential phytonutrients in red, purple, and black whole-grain jasmine rice differ. 
  5. These plant ingredients contain antioxidants, which aid in nourishing and protecting your cells from harm.
Calories180
Protein4 grams
Fat1.5 grams
Carbs38 grams
Fibre2 grams
Iron2% of the DV
Thiamine10% of the DV
Niacin15% of the DV

Table: Nutritional Value of 50g uncooked Brown Jasmine rice. Source: Healthline

Health benefits of Jasmine rice

Weight Gain

  • Jasmine rice can help you get through diets when you need to acquire weight or bulk up. 
  • If you want to carbohydrate load or get quick energy, one plate of jasmine rice can assist. 
  • A cup of cooked jasmine rice has around 180 calories. 
  • The starch in rice will be converted down into fuel, which will offer your body with energy and strength. 
  • People who are attempting to gain weight can eat jasmine rice since the quantity of calories may result in a healthy weight increase.

Development of foetus

  • Folic acid, an artificial form of folate (vitamin B9), is found in jasmine rice. 
  • Folic acid consumption is critical during pregnancy since it can aid in the growth of the foetus. 
  • Folic acid consumption prior to pregnancy can help avoid birth problems such as neural tube defects, which are malformations in the brain or spine. 
  • Folic acid levels in the mother’s body can aid in the healthy development of the baby’s heart and blood vessels. 
  • In conclusion to all of the above considerations, jasmine rice might be a suitable choice for folic acid consumption during pregnancy.

High Iron levels

  • Jasmine rice is high in iron and can assist our bodies in producing red blood cells. 
  • A lack of iron can cause anaemia, a disorder characterised by symptoms such as fatigue, headaches, a rapid heart rate, shortness of breath, and so on. 
  • Iron can also aid in the maintenance of healthy hair, skin, and nails. 
  • Because women lose iron during menstruation, jasmine rice can help them receive enough iron.

High in Fiber

  • Brown jasmine rice is abundant in insoluble fibre, which aids in the maintenance of our digestive systems. 
  • Brown jasmine rice is less processed than other rice kinds and has more nutrients. This type of jasmine rice might help us stay full and avoid overeating. 
  • It can also assist us in overcoming the problem of constipation. 
  • The fibre in jasmine rice can soften our stools and assist our bodies in absorbing nutrients from the food by delaying the food transit in our bodies.

Builds Immunity

  • Jasmine rice contains phytonutrients, which are compounds that protect our cells and boost our immune. 
  • Jasmine rice is high in manganese, a mineral that is essential for the proper functioning of our bodies. 
  • This rice variety might also be a wonderful dietary choice to include in the diets of athletes or those who participate in endurance sports. 
  • Both white and brown jasmine rice can help our muscles store glycogen, which is necessary for smooth and high-intensity exercises.

Sushi Rice

  • Sushi rice is more of a method of preparation than a variety of rice. 
  • Cooked short-grain white rice is blended with rice vinegar and other seasonings, and then allowed to cool fully before being used to form sushi rolls. 
  • This glutinous rice has a greater starch content than other types, giving it the sticky texture desired for sushi. 
  • Sushi rice is traditionally seasoned with rice vinegar, white sugar, and salt. This dish uses vegetable oil rather than a stronger oil, allowing the basic ingredients to shine.

Healthier Varieties of Rice for Sushi

  1. If you want to recreate the traditional sushi flavour and texture, use Japonica rice. 
  2. These are short, round, smooth, and hard grains that are high in amylopectin (starch), which hydrolyzes in hot water and gives the rice a tougher, stickier texture. 
  3. Sushi rice is the next rice variant. Sushi rice is frequently confused with Japonica rice.
  4. However, the two are not the same. Sushi rice is a term used by some manufacturers to describe short-grain Japanese or medium-grain California rice. 
  5. As a result, if you ask for sushi rice, you may receive medium-grain California rice, which is OK to use, but I prefer short-grain Japonica rice.
  6. Calrose rice is a well-known and well-recognised kind of California rice with medium grain that softens and gets sticky after boiling.

Healthy rice alternatives for people on the diet

Brown Rice

  • Brown rice is the least commonly utilised type of rice in sushi dishes, yet it is the healthiest alternative. 
  • This gluten-free, very nutritious rice is high in vitamins and minerals and is ideal for persons with diabetes or on a weight-loss diet. 
  • Brown rice, on the other hand, takes a little longer to cook and has a strong flavour that not everyone likes in sushi.

Quinoa Rice

  • Quinoa is the greatest alternative for vegetarian sushi lovers, adding a number of exotic vegetables to the sushi and those who are gluten intolerant since it is high in protein, vitamins, minerals, and nutritional fibre. 
  • Quinoa, on the other hand, takes longer to cook and is not starchy.

Broccoli Rice

  • Next time, make a healthier sushi roll using broccoli rice. 
  • Broccoli rice has a lot of antioxidants, protein, and fibre. 
  • To make this, finely cut the broccoli blossoms and simmer them as you normally would, then season with salt and pepper to taste.

Cauliflower Rice

  • Another healthy choice for avoiding gluten and additional carbohydrates is cauliflower rice. 
  • This rice is simple to make at home. To do this, simply grate a fresh cauliflower to mimic short-grain rice. 
  • Cook till soft at a low temperature; do not add water because they will cook in their own water. 
  • To dulcify and acidify the cauliflower’s dull flavour, add olive oil and additional ingredients such as salt, sugar, and vinegar.

Couscous

  • Couscous is not rice, but it is a nutritious substitute for sushi fans who are unable to swallow sushi rice. 
  • It’s high in protein, fibre, and B vitamins, and it’s naturally fat-free. 
Calories160
Fat0.2 g
Cholesterol0 mg
Sodium10.5 mg
Total Carbs38 g
Dietary Fiber0 g
Sugar0 g
Protein2 g

Table: Nutritional value of White Sushi Rice. Source Livestrong.com

Health benefits of Sushi rice

Fat-Free

  • Sushi rice is almost fat-free, and a typical sushi lunch is minimal in both total fat and calorific value. 
  • Sushi rice made without cooking oil is inherently low in calories.

High Fiber

  • According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, brown rice has the extra benefit of supplying dietary fibre, which supports your heart and digestive health and helps manage blood sugar levels. 

High Vitamin B

  • A 3/4 cup of sushi rice has an abundance of vitamins B1 and B9, as well as B3 and B6. B vitamins are necessary because they help your body manufacture red blood cells and energy from the food you eat.

Jasmine Rice vs. Sushi Rice

Here’s a more detailed table that highlights the differences between Jasmine rice and Sushi rice.

AspectJasmine RiceSushi Rice
TypeAromatic long-grain riceShort-grain glutinous rice
ProcessingLargely processedProcessed for sushi
Cooking varietiesWhite, black, purple, redWhite, Calrose, Japonica
Calories180 kcal160 kcal
Protein4 g2g
Fat1.5g0.2g
Carbohydrates38g38g
Fibre2g0g
Health BenefitsWeight gain, folic acid, iron, high in fibreFat-free, high fiber, Vitamin B
Additional BenefitsAntioxidants, phytonutrientsSticky texture for sushi rolls
Suitable ForEveryday meals, various dishesSushi rolls, Japanese cuisine
Healthier VarietiesBrown jasmine riceJaponica rice, Calrose rice
Special PreparationNoneVinegar seasoning for sushi

Conclusion

More than 90% of the world’s rice is farmed in Asia, mostly in China, India, Indonesia, and Bangladesh, with minor amounts grown in Japan, Pakistan, and a number of Southeast Asian countries. Jasmine rice is available in a range of hues. White jasmine rice, in particular, is highly processed and resembles white rice nutritionally more than brown jasmine rice.

Brown jasmine rice has fewer processing steps than white rice. It has only the outer husk, not the bran and germ, like all whole grains. Sushi rice is traditionally seasoned with rice vinegar, white sugar, and salt. Sushi rice is a term used by some manufacturers to describe short-grain Japanese or medium-grain California rice. Sushi rice is almost fat-free, and a typical sushi lunch is minimal in both total fat and calorific value.

Faqs

Can you use jasmine rice for sushi?

Yes, you can use jasmine rice for sushi, but it’s not the traditional choice. Sushi rice, or short-grain Japanese rice, is typically preferred for its stickiness and flavor.

What type of rice is used in sushi?

Sushi is traditionally made with short-grain Japanese rice, known as “sushi rice.” Its sticky texture helps hold the sushi together.

What is the best Japanese rice for sushi?

The best Japanese rice for sushi is usually a short-grain variety like Japonica rice. Brands like Koshihikari and Tamaki Gold are popular choices among sushi enthusiasts.

Are there any good sushi rice substitutes?

In a pinch, you can use short-grain Arborio rice as a sushi rice substitute. However, it may have a slightly different texture and flavor.

How many calories are in jasmine rice?

Jasmine rice contains approximately 150 calories per cooked 1/2 cup serving. It’s important to note that sushi rice and jasmine rice have different characteristics and calorie counts.


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